The Adventures of the Rogue Art Historian

The misfit adventures of this rogue art historian are valued and kept secret. These gems are true black pearls which have found their way away from the salty dark water to your face... lick them, stick them, devour them and enjoy...

When I was a younger man, art was a lonely thing. No galleries, no collectors, no critics, no money. Yet, it was a golden age, for we all had nothing to lose and a vision to gain. Today it is not quite the same. It is a time of tons of verbiage, activity, consumption. Which condition is better for the world at large I shall not venture to discuss. But I do know that many of those who are driven to this life are desperately searching for those pockets of silence where we can root and grow. We must all hope we find them.

—Mark Rothko (via tierradentro)

Yes

(via acrylicalchemy)

experimentsinmotion:

Olafur Eliasson’s “Riverbed” Converts a Museum into a Natural Landscape

Danish-Icelandic artist Olafur Eliasson, known for his large-scale installations employing elemental materials like light, water, earth, and even atmosphere, transformed an entire wing of Denmark’s Louisiana Museum of Modern Art into a riverbed for his first solo exhibition. The work, which uses rocks, soil, and running water to precisely emulate a natural landscape, stands in stark contrast to the white walls of one of Denmark’s most important Modernist buildings. Originally designed in 1958 by architects Jørgen Bo and Wilhlem Wohlert, the Louisiana’s staggered, irregularly sized portals create an experience that highlights movement through space. By filling the Louisiana with a landscape its galleries might have replaced, Eliasson heightens the haptic qualities of this experience and points to the reality of the museum as an institution and a physical locality. The work raises the question of how natural and built environments might intersect, though it is up to the viewer to decide whether this tension is constructive or destructive.

(Source: dezeen.com, via acrylicalchemy)

I am a forest, and a night of dark trees: but he who is not afraid of my darkness, will find banks full of roses under my cypresses.

—Friedrich Nietzsche, Thus Spoke Zarathustra (via whyallcaps)

(via yesstess)

dollypardon:

I have an interview this week for a really cool farm in Montana… I am gonna do it all.

dollypardon:

I have an interview this week for a really cool farm in Montana… I am gonna do it all.

(via yesstess)

Life of An Artist presents

"Professional Practices"

Since Barbara’s departure from Life of An Artist and the Grand Central Art Center residency, Ingrid and Evan have been investigating how successful female artists and art professionals keep their professional practice intact, when life interferes. With the help of their intern, Sydney and their new Chief Videographer/Editor Sarinah Simons, Ingrid and Evan look into what ‘success’ looks like in the art world, both for artists and those on the business side of art. Through some insightful interviews with great female art professionals like Alexandra Grant, Carrie Yury, Arzu Kosar, Tulsa Kinney and Lydia Emily, the Life of an Artist team really explores the detail, drive and struggles involved in the journey to being a ‘successful’ art professional, and what it takes to build and maintain that life.
Ingrid is settling into being a full-time mom and full-time artist, but still trying to find balance, stability, and support. Meanwhile, Evan is researching and documenting what kind of route different women take to reach their own personal goals of success as art professionals, while also investigating her own definition of success and what that entails. This episode includes insights that all future female artists and art professionals should be aware of, going into the tumultuous art world terrain.

    • www.lifeofanartist.tv
My latest #article for @kcet #artbound is on an amazing exhibit on the influential #arthistory of #thevalley! Check it out! 
“The story of the Valley may not be as glamorous as the greater Los Angeles, but Willick says that he was influenced by the way PST looked at regional art, and thought it’d be the perfect time to explore the valley’s rich history in art as well. ‘It’s not really a heroic narrative, and I think that PST has created a narrative of Los Angeles that is really great undoubtedly, but it told a story that was extraordinary, and I’m looking at a part of Los Angeles that could be described as ordinary,’ Willick says.” 
Read the full story at kcet.org/artbound

My latest #article for @kcet #artbound is on an amazing exhibit on the influential #arthistory of #thevalley! Check it out!
“The story of the Valley may not be as glamorous as the greater Los Angeles, but Willick says that he was influenced by the way PST looked at regional art, and thought it’d be the perfect time to explore the valley’s rich history in art as well. ‘It’s not really a heroic narrative, and I think that PST has created a narrative of Los Angeles that is really great undoubtedly, but it told a story that was extraordinary, and I’m looking at a part of Los Angeles that could be described as ordinary,’ Willick says.”
Read the full story at kcet.org/artbound